Daily Bulletin

News

  • Written by Colleen Murrell, Associate Professor, Journalism, Swinburne University of Technology
The Conversation

Like so many times before with acts of mass violence in different parts of the world, news of shootings at two Christchurch mosques on Friday instantly ricocheted around the world via social media.

When these incidents occur, online activity follows a predictable pattern as journalists and others try to learn the name of the perpetrator and any reason behind the killings.

This time they did not have to wait long. In an appalling example of the latest technology, the gunman reportedly livestreamed his killings on Facebook. According to reports, the footage apparently showed a man moving through the interior of a mosque and shooting at his victims indiscriminately.

Amplifying the spread of this kind of material can be harmful.

Read more: Since Boston bombing, terrorists are using new social media to inspire potential attackers

Mainstream media outlets posted raw footage from gunman

The video was later taken down but not before many had called out the social media company. The ABC’s online technology reporter, Ariel Bogle, blamed the platforms for allowing the video to be shared.

ABC investigative reporter Sophie McNeil asked people on Twitter not to share the video, since the perpetrator clearly wanted it to be widely disseminated. New Zealand police similarly urged people not to share the link and said they were working to have the footage removed.

Following a spate of killings in France in 2015 and 2016, French mainstream media proprietors decided to adopt a policy of not recycling pictures of atrocities.

The editor of Le Monde, Jérôme Fenoglio, said:

Following the attack in Nice, we will no longer publish photographs of the perpetrators of killings, to avoid possible effects of posthumous glorification.

Today, information about the name of the Christchurch gunman, his photograph and his Twitter account, were easy to find. Later, it was possible to see that his Twitter account had been suspended. On Facebook, it was easy to source pictures, and even a selfie, that the alleged perpetrator had shared on social media before entering the mosque.

But it was not just social media that shared the pictures. Six minutes of raw video was posted by news.com.au, which, after a warning at the front of the clip, showed video from the gunman’s helmet camera as he drove through the streets on his way to the mosque.

Read more: Mainstream media outlets are dropping the ball with terrorism coverage

The risks of sharing information about terrorism

Sharing this material can be highly problematic. In some past incidences of terrorism and hate crime, pictures of the wrong people have been published around the world on social and in mainstream media.

After the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, the wrong man was fingered as a culprit by a crowd-sourced detective hunt on various social media sites.

There is also the real fear that publishing such material could lead to copycat crimes. Along with the photographs and 17 minutes of film, the alleged perpetrator has penned a 73-page manifesto, in which he describes himself as “just a regular white man”.

A Norwegian extremist who killed 69 people on the island of Utøya in 2011, took a similar approach to justifying his acts. Before his killing spree, he wrote a 1,518 page manifesto called “2083: A European Declaration of Independence”.

Read more: Four ways social media companies and security agencies can tackle terrorism

The public’s right to know

Those who believe in media freedom and the public’s right to know are likely to complain if information and pictures are not available in full view on the internet. Conspiracies fester when people believe they are not being told the truth.

Instant global access to news can also pose problems to subsequent trials of perpetrators, as was shown in the recent case involving Cardinal George Pell.

While some large media platforms, like Facebook and Twitter, are under increasing pressure to clean up their acts in terms of publishing hate crime material, it is nigh on impossible to stop the material popping up in multiple places elsewhere.

Members of the public, and some media organisations, will not stop speculating, playing detective or “rubber necking” at horror, despite what well-meaning social media citizens may desire. For the media, it’s all about clicks, and unfortunately horror drives clicks.

Update from the ABC: Facebook says it has taken down a video of the shootings at a New Zealand mosque and removed the identified shooter’s accounts from its platforms after being alerted by police.

Facebook New Zealand spokeswoman Mia Garlick said in a statement the company was “also removing any praise or support for the crime and the shooter or shooters as soon as we’re aware.”

Both YouTube owner Google and Twitter also said they were working to remove video of the shootings from their sites.

Authors: Colleen Murrell, Associate Professor, Journalism, Swinburne University of Technology

Read more http://theconversation.com/why-news-outlets-should-think-twice-about-republishing-the-new-zealand-mosque-shooters-livestream-113651


The Conversation

Politics

Senator Colbeck named Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians and Minister for Youth and Sport

Liberal Senator for Tasmania Richard Colbeck has expressed his excitement in taking on responsibility for the portfolios of Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians and Minister for Youth and S...

Daily Bulletin - avatar Daily Bulletin

Senator Canavan: Statement on Queensland Government's decision on Adani

I welcome the Queensland Government's announcement regarding timelines for Adani's approvals, but I don't thank them. The thanks go to the people of Central Queensland who have forced this outcome t...

Senator Canavan - avatar Senator Canavan

Australians reject Labor’s marine park lock outs

Australians have rejected Labor’s plans to return to their disastrous marine park lock outs policy. Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources Richard Colbeck said the strong result fo...

Senator Colbeck - avatar Senator Colbeck

Business News

The right way of compliance training: LMS

Does your business fall in the category of a small business, medium business or a highly regulated enterprise? Regardless, compliance training is unarguably necessary for everyone. However, many ...

News Company - avatar News Company

How Car Trailers Benefit Small Farmers

Farming activity requires moving implements, fertilizer, seeds, pesticides, equipments, tools and a host of other things to and from the farm, nearly as a regular activity. Even when your farm is at c...

News Company - avatar News Company

How to Ensure a Successful Letterbox Drop

With the clamour surrounding social media and digital marketing, you might be wondering why you should revert back to the older technique of a letterbox drop.When done right, a letterbox drop can be...

News Company - avatar News Company

Travel

What to Pack for a Tropical Vacation

Going on a vacation is one of the favourite activities for most of us. Sunny beaches and blue sea as far as your eyes can see; all you have to do is relax and enjoy your vacation to the fullest. How...

Brigitte Evans - avatar Brigitte Evans

Golden Year Guide - Preparing For Post-Retirement Travelling

Retirement is something that many of us spend most of our lives looking forward to, it is supposed to be what all that hard work and sacrifice is for. A lot of us have big plans for when we retire, ...

News Company - avatar News Company

5 Glamping Winter Getaways Perfect for this Season

Glamping, also known as “glamorous camping”, is such a huge trend right now all across the globe. Of course, this is no exception for travellers in Australia. From adorable cottages to luxurious be...

Laura Grant - avatar Laura Grant

ShowPo